If your travels take you to Europe this summer, photographs by Lori Nix are currently exhibiting at the Museum Schloss Moyland in northwestern Germany.  Lori just returned from a brief stay in Germany for the opening, and commented that this exhibit is the best she has ever had. A book is being published in conjunction with the exhibit, which includes photographs from two bodies of work, The City and Lost. Below is a brief description of the exhibit, and information about the museum.

Lori Nix, Subway, 2012

Lori Nix, Subway, 2012

May 10 –  August 9, 2015
Lori Nix – The Power of Nature
Museum Schloss Moyland,  Bedburg-Hau, Germany

Lori Nix (born 1969) is a storyteller par excellence. In her photographs she whisks the viewer off to fictive places such as a museum, library, launderette or shopping mall, which bear testimony to the past existence of human beings on this earth and the achievements of their civilisations.

With her photographs, whose motifs are based on small-scale dioramas that she constructs herself, the artist threatens to topple our anthropocentric view of the world. Human control centres and public places are reduced to absurdity. Nature alone remains, the last bastion of life.

The show is sponsored by the Kunststiftung NRW and the Landschaftsverband Rheinland and is the first museum exhibition of Lori Nix’s work in Europe.

Here is a pdf of the museum leaflet: LoriNix-The PowerOfNature


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Museum Schloss Moyland

The Museum Schloss Moyland is a museum of modern and contemporary art as well as an international research center on Joseph Beuys. The museum’s collection is based on the former private collection of the brothers van der Grinten and is preserved and displayed in the historic castle and park complex. It is also the site of the Joseph Beuys Archive and the museum library.

With its diverse exhibition, events and education program as well as the historic castle complex within the spacious garden, the museum is an attraction of international importance.

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